Festivals


Each year, since the farm began in 1995, we have hosted a Corn Boil. The tradition goes back even further. In 1981, David and I were living on a farm in Helenville, Jefferson Co. We hosted a Corn Boil for all of our friends and neighbors during our 3 year duration on that farm. Then we had a 10 year stint living on the Isthmus so we were excited to bring back the Corn Boil. Our first years on this farm had fewer CSA members so the Corn Boil was a combination of members, neighbors, friends and family. Each year has its own special memories. But each year I have the chance to connect with and talk with our members, many whom I now consider friends.

Barb

Corn Boil 2017

Corn Boil 1995

Whether this is your first season or your twenty-third, you are what this farm is all about! Twenty-three years ago, before most people knew what CSA was, David and I started this farm. We strongly believed in the concept of CSA and wanted all of the food grown on our farm to go only to our CSA members. We didn’t know if this was possible, but we gave it a try. We didn’t know if it was possible to make a living growing organic vegetables and distributing them through our CSA but we wanted to give it our best. We quickly got our answer as memberships increased each year. We wanted a connection with our members, something people generally don’t have with the person growing their food and with the farm where it is grown. This is why we give you many opportunities to come out to the farm during the season. We hope to meet you for the first time or see you again. We hope you enjoy the food that comes your way. And we always welcome questions or comments along the way. Happy season #23 from Vermont Valley Community Farm!

Barb

Monday morning. Harvesting rhubarb from our quarter acre rhubarb patch. That’s a lot of rhubarb!

Tuesday morning. Harvesting spinach. We pinch off leaf by leaf. Yum.

Tuesday morning. Scallion harvest. My view as I sat on the ground trimming roots.

Early Wednesday morning. Salad mix harvest. The sun is just rising in our valley.

Monday afternoon. Weighing and banding rhubarb.

Wednesday afternoon. Washing and trimming fresh garlic.

August, ask any vegetable farmer how they feel at the end of August and you will either get dead-pan silence or a long winded saga. A mix of long days, heavy harvests, and hot weather can make even the heartiest farmer long for the first frost. One of our favorite things about August is having our CSA members come out to the farm to get down and do some harvesting of their own. We invite members to come out on 4 weekends to pick Roma tomatoes, basil, hot peppers, and tomatillos. Most people can or freeze the bounty to extend the local eating experience into the winter. Even though the temperatures are still warm, autumn is hanging in the air which makes putting food up for winter feel like the instinctively right way to spend the weekend. We have one more U-Pick event coming up this weekend – time to gather up your tomatoes and celebrate the end of August and the transition into fall! More info.

~Jonnah

If you are a member of our CSA and have already come out to a U Pick event but would like more tomatoes, email us to let us know you will be coming again.

Tomatoes dripping from the vine.

Tomatoes dripping from the vine.

Harvesting Roma's for a big canning project

Harvesting Roma’s for a big canning project.

Judith has been a CSA member since 1995 - our second season! She comes out to as many farm events as she can. Here she is with basil she harvested for her marinara sauce.

Judith has been a CSA member since 1995 – our second season! She comes out to as many farm events as she can. Here she is with basil she harvested for her marinara sauce.

Thousands of bed feet of Roma's.

Thousands of bed feet of Roma’s.

Everyone helps to fill heaping bags of tomatos!

Everyone helps to fill heaping bags of tomatoes!

Sunday’s corn boil was a fun time for all who attended. Harvesting sweet corn is an adventure, especially if you have never done it before. David encourages tasting an ear raw in the field, always a pleasant surprise. Perfect weather, ordered up just for the day. Thank you to everyone who brought such a delicious dish to pass. The food was amazing! The day was a spectacular mix of friends, families, children, grandparents, people arriving on bikes, long time members, first time members, exchange students, babies (the youngest being 13 days old). Thanks everyone for making the 22nd Corn Boil really special.

Barb

Harvesting sweet corn for the very first time!

Harvesting sweet corn for the very first time!

Yum. Eating great food, enjoying a great view, relaxing with family and friends.

Yum. Eating great food, enjoying a great view, relaxing with family and friends.

Barb and David welcoming everyone.

Barb and David welcoming everyone.

David talking with members and answering questions about the corn and the farm.

David talking with members and answering questions about the corn and the farm.

Third generation Vermont Valley farmers. Felix, Paavo and Mischa; Barb and David’s grand kids.

Third generation Vermont Valley farmers. Felix, Paavo and Mischa; Barb and David’s grand kids.

Every summer a group of Central American students come to the farm for a tour. They are part of a UW program and accompanied by a professor. This year the students are from Costa Rica. I spent a year in Costa Rica as an exchange student so I am able to give the tour in Spanish. Coming from a very different climate and ecosystem they are very interested in the farm and always have many questions about how we farm organically.

Eric

Costa Ricans

 

What a perfectly lovely day. Hundreds of people came out to the farm to harvest basil and make pesto. It was such a perfect expression of community coming together around food. The event was captured by Julie Garrett. She produces a weekly segment called Five Minutes on the Farm. She was a Fairshare CSA Coalition staff person for several years and is now doing this work to show off CSA farms. Enjoy the piece. It’s only 5 minutes!

See photos and read more about Julie’s day with us at the Pesto Fest

 

This is the most beautiful fall I can remember. We haven’t had a frost yet, which is quite unusual. We typically see our first frost around September 25th in our cold valley. This fall we head right into the fields at 7:30 in the morning to begin harvest; most years we have to wait for the vegetables to thaw (literally). The vegetables we are delivering speak of fall, warm soups and hearty dishes. Fall crops are patient. We harvest them when it fits our schedule. Summer crops demand daily harvests or they over ripen. Fall crops wait in and on the ground. Squashes, beets, radishes, celeriac, kale, carrots, even lettuce. We gather all of our workers together for these large harvests. During the summer we usually have several harvest crews out at once, finishing one harvest and on to the next. This time of year we use large bins to carry the vegetables. They get stacked high in a large cooler and wait for us to come clean them. David and Jesse are busy tilling the ground and planting cover crops on gardens that only a few weeks ago were bursting with food. We are thankful for the great weather and plentiful crops we had this season. The frost will eventually come, it always does; but this warm weather is certainly out of character.

Barb

Last Sunday’s Pumpkin Pick was enjoyed by many. Thanks for coming out!

Last Sunday’s Pumpkin Pick was enjoyed by many. Thanks for coming out!

A teen group from Goodman Community Center came out on Monday to gather pumpkins. They will make lots of low income kids happy!

A teen group from Goodman Community Center came out on Monday to gather pumpkins. They will make lots of low income kids happy!

Harvesting Carnival squash last Friday. We clip the stems, put them into crates, carry the crates to the bulk bin and count them into the bin.

Harvesting Carnival squash last Friday. We clip the stems, put them into crates, carry the crates to the bulk bin and count them into the bin.

Red lettuce harvest. Eric J-Mo and Becca cut the lettuce heads while everyone else removes any bad leaves and carefully puts 6 in each crate.

Red lettuce harvest. Eric J-Mo and Becca cut the lettuce heads while everyone else removes any bad leaves and carefully puts 6 in each crate.

A lush crop of kale.

A lush crop of kale.

Two weeks ago hundreds of members converged on the farm to pick basil and make pesto. It was a lovely day for all who ventured out. The weather was perfect, the aroma of fresh basil hung in the air, lots of pesto was prepared and everyone seemed to have a wonderful time.

We host festivals so you can come out to the farm and we have a chance to meet you. Hope to see you out here this season.

Barb

After the basil is picked, members stand around tables picking off the leaves. It is a way to enjoy the company of friends, family and other members.

After the basil is picked, members stand around tables picking off the leaves. It is a way to enjoy the company of friends, family and other members.

Prepping to make lots of pesto!

Prepping to make lots of pesto!

This group had so much fun experimenting with the taste of their pesto. I was lucky to be standing at their table tasting and agreeing that yes this one is very cheesy or garlicky. Fun.

This group had so much fun experimenting with the taste of their pesto. I was lucky to be standing at their table tasting and agreeing that yes this one is very cheesy or garlicky. Fun.

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