October 2017


2017 Farm Crew

Twenty-three years of Vermont Valley Community Farm.  For Barb and I, we find ourselves talking about “do you remember when”. But just like family picture albums, reminiscing is ok for a little bit. So briefly, we’ve been at it from the beginning of CSA in Wisconsin. There has been exciting growth in the CSA world; lots of new farms and farmers. Different twists for every farm, each being unique. Part of our purpose has been to grow the CSA movement. We have given countless workshops, seminars, one-on-one consultations and have helped lots of beginning CSA farmers. It has been very rewarding for us. Vermont Valley has been complimented by being mimicked time and again. We have grown, innovated, learned and most recently downsized; but, enough for the past.

I tend to always look forward, how to make it better; yes, how to change next year. “Same old thing” is definitely not my game. You all have had the opportunity to read about our new plans for 2018. We asked for feedback and received it (thanks).  A lot of thought went into this, so I want to share some of that.

The local food movement has exploded during our 23 CSA years; you now have lots of choices; farmers markets everywhere, organic in every store, more and more people trying to start a farm business. This is great in many ways.  However, for some of the choices out there now, local is nothing but a clever marketing ploy; buyer-beware. All the local choices (real and fake) have impacted CSAs. CSAs across the board are experiencing membership reductions, us included. People are making other “local” choices.  CSA has impacted the food market (yeh!), but that marketplace is evolving. This means CSA is here to stay, but it needs to adapt. There has been much discussion among CSA farmers about all this. So given what is happening in the CSA world, I unearthed my prior career “analyst hat”. I was looking for what we do best.

Your Comments: Some members have said “great idea”; we agree. Others are concerned or confused. What has been fun is the “eating with the seasons” lecture we have heard a few times from concerned members; which is great to hear; it’s what we preach. So what does “eating with the seasons” mean?  Some farms strive to deliver nearly 12 months a year; we never have. For us, CSA is about supporting your farm that feeds you. It is up to the farm to make that a great experience, whatever the mix of products, farm events or length of season. The CSA model is the weekly box from your farm. Our changes are meant to treat you to the best. We are honing in on the weeks we do it best at Vermont Valley Community Farm.

I can say with complete confidence that the 20 deliveries in our 2018 season will be the best we have ever done. Why, because they are the weeks when Wisconsin offers its best. If you are still not sure, I would ask you to defer to our farming expertise. I refer back to the reminiscing section above; we know what we’re doing out here.

Thanks, and we hope you have enjoyed eating well in 2017. We will be very pleased to feed you again in 2018.

David Perkins

Winter squash, sweet potatoes, pie pumpkins, ruby heart radishes, carrots, celeriac, beets, cooking greens, potatoes all define how we eat in the fall. And what do all of these foods have in common? They keep very well. Think about it, before Wisconsinites had grocery stores, they had gardens and root cellars. The food that was harvested in the fall had to keep all winter and be enjoyed for many months. This time of year is our opportunity to do just that.

When we started this farm 23 years ago we made the big leap into full-on seasonal eating. If we aren’t growing it, we’re not eating it. We make it through the winter with a handful of vegetables which we have learned to love and be creative with, or not, sometimes it’s the same old, same old. Truly, it’s really easy and fun. Easy because I know what I have to cook with and that’s that. No fancy recipes using all kinds of imported vegetables. The ultimate CSA experience.

These last few deliveries have been getting heavier and heavier with storage produce. And then there is the Storage Share in November and December. If you haven’t signed up yet, this is a good time to think about what it means to eat seasonally in Wisconsin and have some fun with it.

Barb

Acorn squash harvest. Clipping, gathering and counting the squash into bins.

Swiss chard harvest. Lots of hands cutting the chard; then bringing it back to the packing shed where we band it, dip it into tubs of cold water and put it into a 32 degree cooler.

Carnival squash bounty. Jesse is bringing the bins of harvested squash to the packing shed to be stored until we wash it and deliver it.