I’m talking about rainfall and irrigation time. One nice rainfall eliminates about forty hours of labor irrigating the crops. It was getting really dry in the fields. David and Jesse were working from dawn to dusk, seven days a week, moving irrigation guns (a traveling gun is a big real with a water spray that moves up the field) from crop to crop, letting them run their course and then moving them to the next area of the field. This can mean the difference between keeping a crop alive or watching it suffer in the heat and dry conditions, but it is hard to keep up.  Our fields are geographically spread out. The irrigation is moved with a tractor. Each run can take up to 8 hours. The settings are coordinated with how much water needs to be distributed. When it is 90 degrees and windy and it hasn’t rained in many days and everything is looking parched, this is a huge task. Mother Nature can deliver this to all of the vegetables at once in one rainfall. So when the sky opened up and gave us about an inch of rain on Monday night, we could give a sigh of relief. The thirsty crops were very happy and Jesse and David could focus their attention on other tasks in need of their time.

Harvesting salad mix on Tuesday morning after the glorious rain!

Eric (standing) needed to remove his shoes because they were sinking in the mud. Behind Eric is some irrigation equipment. On Tuesday afternoon, before it rained, we were irrigating this field because we had just transplanted new salad mix and it needed water. We turned off the irrigation when it started to rain.

Green garlic harvest. After we pull the garlic from the earth, we trim the leaves. Then the big task of spraying off the dirt.

Jesse pulling the irrigation gun out from the reel

Irrigating cabbage