A big Badger Bus pulled up to the farm, I hopped in and directed the group to the field where we are conducting tomato trials (see last week’s post). This group of 40+ was a scientific community of graduate students, researchers, farmers, and industry professionals gathering for the fourth year to build relationships and form collaborations as they develop the organic seed movement. Now that’s important work!!! They came from around the country and around the world. The group spent an hour with Jesse and David in our field in Arena where we grow State Certified/Organic Certified seed potatoes to sell to other organic farms. They spent another hour with me in our tomato trial field. We talked about what our practices in these areas and were told that the work we do on our farm is incredibly important to the organic seed community and movement. On a daily basis, my time is spent working hard growing vegetables. I do what I do because I believe it is the right thing to do. It was affirming and empowering to have the opportunity to share our work and expertise with industry leaders (heads of seed companies, seed breeders, professors, graduate students). Together we are working to strengthen organic seed quality and availability.

Barb

Jesse Perkins talking about the Organic Seed potatoes he and his dad, David, grow on this farm.

Jesse Perkins talking about the Organic Seed potatoes he and his dad, David, grow on this farm.

Barb Perkins talking to the Seed Symposium group about the tomato trials she is doing together with Johnny’s Selected Seeds.

Barb Perkins talking to the Seed Symposium group about the tomato trials she is doing together with Johnny’s Selected Seeds.

The Seed Symposium group interacting with Barb as tomato trials are discussed.

The Seed Symposium group interacting with Barb as tomato trials are discussed.

Vermont Valley seed symposium