Let’s talk about the big storm. It seems to have hit everyone and we all have our own story. Here’s ours. I awoke at 3:00am to the sound of gentle thunder. Then the power blinked on and off. Figured I had better let the dog in, she gets pretty scared. And I may as well take a peek at the radar so I know what we have in store for us for the day’s activities. Just then the wind started blowing, howling, pounding. I heard that train sound people talk about with tornadoes. I had better find a working flashlight. Found one. I closed the big packing shed door, we have a remote, so I could close it from the house. The potting shed door needed to stay open, I wasn’t going outside. Now to go study the radar and read the Storm Advisory. Didn’t look good. I need to make the decision to call off our Cambodian crew or not. Eight of them were on their way. A few more minutes with the radar and I picked up the phone to call them. It was 4:00am I got a hold of Rith, the driver. He was on his way to pick up one more person (they all carpool together). I said we may need to call the day off. We had already received over an inch of rain in one hour and I was watching the rain gauge go up quickly. He said it wasn’t so bad where they were on the south side of Madison near the beltline, but I warned him it would be bad soon. Within minutes he said they were pulling off the road to sit it out. We talked for another 5 min or so as I continued to watch the radar. The storm was moving through quickly. By 6:00am when they start work it should be past. It would be really wet, but more rain was in the forecast and it could be worse the next day. What should we do? I told them to come. When they pulled it just before 6:00 we had gotten 1.8 inches of rain and there were limbs and branches strewn all over the farm. The first job was to help me clean the place up. Then off they went to our field in Arena to harvest peas. My next crew arrived at 6:30. Several of them told me of following road crews pushing trees off the road, clearing the way for their car. Somehow, we carried out a nearly normal day. We couldn’t drive the trucks as close to the crops as we usually do for fear of getting stuck, so we did a bit more walking; but we made the most of what Mother Nature had given us and thanked her for 1.8 inches of irrigation that she dumped on the whole farm at once. No serious damage to crops. Barb

Rith clearing branches from around the packing shed and greenhouse.

Rith clearing branches from around the packing shed and greenhouse.

I was out in the fields shortly after 6:00 am to check for any damage and to see how wet it was.

I was out in the fields shortly after 6:00 am to check for any damage and to see how wet it was.

Monday morning Swiss chard harvest.

Monday morning Swiss chard harvest.

Monday morning cucumber harvest, look the sun has come out already.

Monday morning cucumber harvest, look the sun has come out already.

Tuesday morning onion harvest.

Tuesday morning onion harvest.

* Some share will get shell peas this week and the rest of the shares next week; this is because they don’t all mature at once on the vine and need to be harvested multiple times.

Shell peas are a bit old fashioned and truly a ‘slow food’. These peas need to be shelled before you can enjoy them. David timed himself as he shelled our peas, so we know it will take you about 5 minutes to shell your peas; yielding a bit more than 1 cup. They are sugar sweet and can be eaten raw or very lightly steamed. Toss them on a salad or with pasta dish. We have included a recipe. We are excited to be growing them for the first time and want to know if we should grow them again next year. So let us know what you want. We will base our decision on what you say. Thank you.