We began delivering vegetables last week. We began planting seeds in the greenhouse in March. So much gets accomplished before you see a vegetable. By the end of this month we (the farmers and crew) will have reached the halfway mark in our work season. Harvesting and packing share boxes brings a whole new welcome perspective to our weeks. And of course it is why we do everything we do around here. Welcome to the bounty!

Lettuce Head Harvest this week:

Wednesday morning lettuce harvest crew. Barb, Becca, Rachel, Tom, LaVina, Chris, Georgia, Chad

Wednesday morning lettuce harvest crew. Barb, Becca, Rachel, Tom, LaVina, Chris, Georgia, Chad

Chad - Tom - Becca

Chad                                            Tom                                                Becca

This is what was happening in May:

The crew is ‘tucking’ in sweet corn plants. We start our sweet corn in the greenhouse, transplant it into the fields using a mechanical transplanter and if field conditions are not exactly perfect we need to ‘tuck’ it in to make sure it is standing up straight.

The crew is ‘tucking’ in sweet corn plants. We start our sweet corn in the greenhouse, transplant it into the fields using a mechanical transplanter and if field conditions are not exactly perfect we need to ‘tuck’ it in to make sure it is standing up straight.

David cultivating celery. We do a lot of weeding. This is one way we do it.

David cultivating celery. We do a lot of weeding. This is one way we do it.

Putting row cover over newly planted watermelon plants. We do this for insect control.

Putting row cover over newly planted watermelon plants. We do this for insect control.

We just finished row covering this field of squash to keep those darn insect from devouring them.

Just finishing putting row cover on this field of squash to keep those darn insects from devouring them.

Pounding posts between tomato plants. As soon as the plants get big enough we will begin to trellis them, wrapping trellising twine around each post and stretching it next to the sides of the plants.

Pounding posts between tomato plants. As soon as the plants get big enough we will begin to trellis them, wrapping trellising twine around each post and stretching it next to the sides of the plants.