April 2015


Happiness is harvesting fresh greens, and delivering them to you. It’s like raising vegetable children and then sending them out into the world. These vegetable children have had an short and interesting life. They grew up in the cozy confines of our basement, under lights. Then they took the big step into the greenhouse and got to experience natural light and cooler temperatures. When the day came to get planted into the ground they had to be tough. The lowest night time temperature in the hoophouse was 19 degrees. They all froze crispy solid. But then thawed and looked as pretty as could be. This process was repeated time and time again until their friends the tomatoes were planted next to them. Tomatoes can’t freeze and look pretty the next day so we turned on the heat and kept the houses above freezing. When we harvested them yesterday, they were all excited to learn they would be coming your way. Enjoy!

Barb

The forest floor is blanketed with ramps. We dig up clusters with a shovel and then separate each individual ramp. Pictured are Chad and Rachel.

The forest floor is blanketed with ramps. We dig up clusters with a shovel and then separate each individual ramp. Pictured are Chad and Rachel.

The crew harvesting spinach and radishes in the hoophouse on Tuesday morning.

The crew harvesting spinach and radishes in the hoophouse on Tuesday morning.

Harvesting sauté mix in the “colossal”, our other hoophouse. We cut each variety of greens separately, take it back to the packing shed and then mix the different varieties in a tub of cold water. It is spun dry in a giant salad spinner and bagged.

Harvesting sauté mix in the “colossal”, our other hoophouse. We cut each variety of greens separately, take it back to the packing shed and then mix the different varieties in a tub of cold water. It is spun dry in a giant salad spinner and bagged.

The beauty of the hoophouse as the plants are growing.

The beauty of the hoophouse as the plants are growing.

 

We did a lot of transplanting this week. In addition to what is pictured, we transplanted lettuce heads, kohlrabi, escarole, peas, fennel and broccoli.

Chris (driving tractor), Chad and Rachel transplant leeks. Something to look forward to in September.

Chris (driving tractor), Chad and Rachel transplant leeks. Something to look forward to in September.

Onion planting. Onions are the first seeds to be planted in the greenhouse in early March. They will be harvested in July.

Onion planting. Onions are the first seeds to be planted in the greenhouse in early March. They will be harvested in July.

When we walk into one of our houses the calendar seems to fast forward. By houses I mean greenhouses. We have three of them on the farm. One for transplant production and two for in-ground planting. On March 11 we planted the first seeds into the transplant greenhouse and have already filled that 1500 sq ft. house twice. When the house gets full we move all of the plants scheduled for outside planting into an adjacent area to harden them off (toughen them up) while still protecting them. Next week onions, scallions, broccoli and lettuce heads will be transplanted into the fields! The hoophouses (our name for the greenhouses where we plant in-ground) got planted on March 14. It was very cold during the days as we planted and it has continued to be cold at night (below freezing, even last night), but the solar effect in these houses warms them up so much that we need to vent and run fans to remove the warm air. It’s the angle of the March sun that is so warming. In less than two weeks we will be harvesting spring share vegetables from the hoophouses. So fast forward the spring and let the bounty begin!

Chad, Eric, Barb and Rachel planting into the Hoophouse on March 16

Chad, Eric, Barb and Rachel planting into the hoophouse on March 16

Here are the same plants just 4 weeks later.

Here are the same plants just 4 weeks later.

Rachel planting tomatoes among the spring share vegetables. After the spring share is harvested, the tomatoes grow in the hoophouse all season. This allows for an early tomato harvest!

Rachel planting tomatoes among the spring share vegetables. After the spring share is harvested, the tomatoes grow in the hoophouse all season. This allows for an early tomato harvest!

Eric P, Chad and Eric F weeding. They are sure making the place look beautiful.

Eric P, Chad and Eric F weeding. They are sure making the place look beautiful.

Here are all of the plants that filled the hoophouse, including the tomatoes!

Here are all of the plants that filled the hoophouse, including the tomatoes!