The delivery of this first Storage Share is a bountiful celebration of nine months of work from seed to share box, and if you include ordering the seeds, it has been a year in the planning. Many of the storage share vegetable seeds get started in the greenhouse in March, when spring has barely begun. Celeriac, for example, is a slow growing plant which needs eight weeks of greenhouse growing time before it gets transplanted into the fields and then needs five months to mature in the field. We’ve learned over the years the importance of planting all of the storage share crops near each other in the field so they can be properly cared for and irrigated for seven months. Some of the storage share vegetables are delivered during our main vegetable delivery season and others are grown just for the storage share. For those crops that are delivered for both seasons, the harvest happens during the main season and a quantity of the crop is held back in one of our coolers for the storage share. For the storage share only crops, the harvest can wait until the main season deliveries end and there is more room in coolers. We also have to play the weather. Too much fall rain can make the fields sticky for an extended time; we want to make sure carrots, for example, are harvested before a heavy fall rain. We watch the size of the fall root vegetables and harvest them before they get too big. This can mean several harvests to pull out the vegetable when it is at the desired size. We plan for a certain number of Storage Shares each year and hold back vegetables accordingly. If the number of Storage Shares sold is less than the plan, which it is this year, we have more of certain crops to divvy out. Hopefully this is seen as a bonus and not a burden. We know that many of the storage share crops need precious refrigerator space. Thanks for plunging in and committing to a Storage Share. This is truly Wisconsin seasonal eating. When the ground freezes and the sun lies low in the sky, you will have roots to cook and bake with for many months.

Barb

Onion plants growing in the greenhouse. Onion seeds are sown in the greenhouse very early March, planted outside in April, harvested in late July and delivered all the way through December.

Onion plants growing in the greenhouse. Onion seeds are sown in the greenhouse very early March, planted outside in April, harvested in late July and delivered all the way through December.

Elisabeth and Tonny harvesting brussels sprouts last week; getting them harvested before the temperatures plunged and the plants froze.  This is our fall garden which also includes cabbage, kale, collards, daikon and ruby heart radishes and celeriac.

Elisabeth and Tonny harvesting brussels sprouts last week; getting them harvested before the temperatures plunged and the plants froze. This is our fall garden which also includes cabbage, kale, collards, daikon and ruby heart radishes and celeriac.

Leek harvest during one of the last warm fall days. The harvested leeks were stored the cooler and then washed just days before they get delivered.

Leek harvest during one of the last warm fall days. The harvested leeks were stored the cooler and then washed just days before they get delivered.

Washing and counting butternut squash. The squash stores better dirty so we wash it shortly before we deliver it.

Washing and counting butternut squash. The squash stores better dirty so we wash it shortly before we deliver it.