Introducing the Vermont Valley Tomato Family 

We are now harvesting from every tomato patch on the farm. Here is what you can expect to see in your share box over the next couple of months. Hopefully this will help you identify it when you see it in your share. Most of our tomatoes are Heirloom varieties. An Heirloom is an open pollinated variety that has been passed down for generations.

Garden Peach: These 2oz yellow fruits blush pink when ripe and have fuzzy skins somewhat like peaches. Soft skinned, juicy and very sweet. Light fruity taste is not what you would expect in a tomato.

Orange Banana: Long, orange paste-type tomato. Sweet and flavorful.

Red Zebra: A small red tomato overlaid with golden yellow stripes.

Ruth’s, Estiva, Arbason, Geronimo, Pink Beauty: Red slicing tomatoes with amazing flavor and texture.

Indigo Rose: A stunningly jet black, 2 oz. tomato that turns from green to a rosy red as it ripens. When sliced it looks just like a plum with its deep red flesh.

Ukrainian Purple: Mahogany-colored, plum shaped fruit. Sweet and meaty.

Japanese Trifele Black: A tomato that looks like a beautiful mahogany-colored Bartlett pear with greenish shoulders. A rich and complex flavor.

Cherry Tomatoes: Sun Gold, Yellow Mini, Sakura (red), Solid Gold and Black Cherry. We mix them up for you.

Roma/Paste/Plum/Processing Tomatoes: These tomatoes are drier than most slicing tomatoes, making them perfect for cooking, drying, sauce and salsa making. We grow a mix of traditional red paste tomatoes and others with fascinating shape, size and color. Here are their names: Plum Regal, Granadero, San Marzano, Monica, Viva Italia, Tiren, Speckled Roman, Amish Paste, Federle, Sheboygan, Opalka, Oxheart.  We invite you to come out to the farm to harvest your own Romas – U Pick details.

We aim to harvest our tomatoes just before they are vine-ripe. We do this so you don’t receive an over ripe tomato. But it also means that you may receive a tomato that needs to sit on your counter for a day or two before it is perfect to eat, heavy and quite soft. And when you do receive a very ripe tomato, eat it up.

Back row (left to right): Ukrainian Purple, Ruth’s, Japanese Trifele Black, Pink Beauty, Garden Peach. Front row: Orange Banana, Indigo Rose, Red Zebra.

Back row (left to right): Ukrainian Purple, Ruth’s, Japanese Trifele Black, Pink Beauty, Garden Peach. Front row: Orange Banana, Indigo Rose, Red Zebra.

Onion Harvest

The onions are the first seeds we plant into the greenhouse in early March. They get planted into the fields in late April. For the past few years we have been planting them directly into plastic mulch. Then we mulch between the plastic beds of onions with straw mulch. The mulch serves several purposes. It keeps the weed pressure way down. There will always be some weeding, especially along the edge where the straw meets the plastic and in the holes where the onion plants are growing. But a huge benefit of the plastic mulch is moisture retention. We lay drip irrigation tape under the plastic so we can water the onions. Onions need significantly more water than most other crops in order to form a bulb. This season in particular there has been a rain shortage and we have been irrigating very frequently. Without the plastic mulch and irrigation tape the onions would be pretty sad. This year’s crop is absolutely beautiful. The crew spent nearly 3 days harvesting and laying out the onions to cure. We lay them in the greenhouse to dry. If you are out here for the Corn Boil, do go take a peek. In about three weeks the tops will be dried down and we will clip off the dried tops and put them all into crates for storage. These onions will be delivered for the rest of the season. If kept cool and dry they will store until June. You can look forward to beautiful onions in your share soon.

Onion harvest. We are nearly finished with the harvest in this picture. You can see the plastic beds where the onions grew. They grow nicely under the plastic where they receive water on a regular basis.

Onion harvest. We are nearly finished with the harvest in this picture. You can see the plastic beds where the onions grew. They grow nicely under the plastic where they receive water on a regular basis.

The onions are laid out in the greenhouse to dry.

The onions are laid out in the greenhouse to dry.

Celery Harvest

Celery is another crop that is planted in the greenhouse in March and grows in the fields for many months before we harvest it. Celery is one of the other crops that needs lots of water to size up. They receive overhead irrigation.

Celery is another crop that is planted in the greenhouse in March and grows in the fields for many months before we harvest it. Celery is one of the other crops that needs lots of water to size up. They receive overhead irrigation.